Picture of Rock of Gibraltar at sunrise as seen from La Linea

Waiting in Gibraltar for the wind to play nice so that we can leave, we thought we would only have a few small tasks to complete and we’d be off. Having just spent 10 weeks in the boatyard giving almost every inch of this girl an overhaul and a load of long awaited TLC, we thought we would only have a few tweaks to make to our new rigging and maybe a few little glitches to iron out before heading south. Wrong again!

Murphy, Sod whoever it is in charge of these things, has been getting in the mix again.  The only things we didn’t touch while in the yard, because we thought they were fine, decided to ’shit the bed’  If you  think you want the cruising life, you better be someone that likes DIY because most of your trip you’ll be fixing your boat in exotic places. We thought there’d be time now to sit back and enjoy the ride. Boy were we wrong!

On the way here, we had a little baptism of fire. We had everything from no wind at all to 30 Knots on the nose with a decent swell running. Not what the weather man had predicted.  Just when we really needed the “iron horse” to help us out a bit, the engine stops and we find we have a serious fuel blockage.  We staggered into the bay at Barbate to get a little shelter, though it was still pretty lumpy. We stayed  just long enough to change the filters and see if we could get some joy out of the engine.  Success, progress again in the right direction until we reached the headland at Tarifa,“the windy city”. Here we always expect the wind and the waves to be at their liveliest and this trip was no exception.  Once you reach Tarifa it’s not that far  up the Straits to Gibraltar and we thought we’d be there in time for breakfast, or brunch at the latest.  No such luck filters clog again and we arrived at La Linea at tea time having spent the entire day tacking up the Strait against 30knots of  wind and the current.  We thought by 5pm it must surely be “Beer O’clock” only to find the fridge that has been keeping our drinks delightfully cold in the boatyard all summer  long, has also decided not to play nice.  I can drink most things, but not warm beer!  And when I said go south till the butter melts, that’s not quite what I had in mind!!

We Spent what should have been our down time in Gibraltar, chasing round after a sheet of Aluminium so we could make a big inspection hatch in the fuel tank and give it a really good clean and for some fridge gas so we can get the beers chillin’.  Before we knew it our sleeping cabin was filled with the pungent odour of diesel and metal shavings everywhere.   Don’t you just love boat living?

Then came all the jobs we had actually planned, tuning up the rigging, that had now had its first good stretch; making a few repairs to our Bimini; realigning the frame of our solar panels, which seemed to have suffered a bit of abuse and was looking a bit Squiffy; filling up with provisions and catching up on a bit of blogging and editing. 

Now It’s all up to Hurricane Ophelia to stop messing with the wind  and then we can make tracks.  Next stop Arrecife Lanzarote and I’m sure there will be more jobs on the list by then.

 

A Picture of our house in NE Algarve Portugal

“ Home is where you leave everything you love and never question that it will be there when you return” Christopher Lee

In spite of being really excited about setting off on our next big adventure I locked our front door and gave the Key to Eduardo with a lump in my throat.   I’ve spent a good chunk of my life travelling and most of the rest of the time suffering with itchy feet.  In all that time, its never been so hard to leave home as this time. 

I’ve been looking for the right place to call home for a long time and I guess I finally found it.  I remember when, having spent several weeks up the Guadiana River over Christmas and New Year in 2010, almost a year later we passed under the Bridge at Ayamonte, to go up river, for the second time.  After a summer out on the water and in the Boatyard it felt like going home. 

A Picture of the bridge at the mouth of the River Guadiana linking Portugal and Spain at sunset

 

With Brexit on the horizon who knows if we will still be able to call it home when we return. This time there is place where we feel at ease with the world, a house that we built with our own hands and a little scrap of a cat that we rescued from starvation wondering why if we feel so settled our feet are still so itchy. I don’t know, some of the places we are going to see have been on my bucket list for a very long time and in the end we rarely regret the things we’ve done in life, rather the things we didn’t. Despite many more ticks against our bucket lists, that are planned for this trip,  It still is really hard to leave this time.

Our first leg of the trip has only been a tiny hop to Gibraltar and in truth it doesn’t even seem like we have really left. We have been in Gibraltar so many times, it’s like a home from home and more so because we can indulge in all the things we miss from the homes we grew up in like a nice pint of bitter, stinky stilton cheese or a steaming plate of fish and chips drenched in malt vinegar for me and a Steak and Ale pie for Steve. 

Preparations are getting to the final stages now though and Im just beginning to feel like it may actually be real. The butterflies in my stomach are beginning to flutter and in a few days  once this swirling stormy mass of low pressure has passed through  we are heading off in earnest south to the Canaries,  then Cape Verde Islands  and finally into the South Atlantic and across to Brazil.  I’ve just bought an extra pack of butter so I can watch it melt as we head south to run away from winter.  I’m definitely looking forward to that!

 

How to go about provisioning for a boat trip   (with difficulty!) 

For a few weeks of cruising for the holidays provisioning for the trip is no big deal. The easiest way is to plan the menu for each meal on each day plus a few snacks and shop for that, job done. You don’t have to actually cook the things in the order on the plan but you will have the ingredients for all of those meals.  

When you are off on your travels for a couple of years or more the simple truth is you can never take enough stuff.  For me as an all-out foodie neither do I really want to.  For me going to markets, supermarkets and small shops in foreign places and seeing what different things are available there, things I may never have seen or heard of before and learning how to prepare them is an adventure all of its own. I can’t wait to get stuck into all the tropical fruits and vegetables Brazil has to offer, to learn their names and delight in their flavours.  I’m sure plenty of them I already know from the time I spent living in Malaysia, though they may come by different names in  Brazil,  I’m sure I’ll manage to find a plethora of things I’ve never eaten  before and I’ll enjoy the chance to try new recipes with them.

The adventure of newness aside, I’m still going to provision our boat with of all the things we like and as many of the things that I know will be difficult to find as we travel Including ingredients for my gluten free diet.

Tea, coffee, sugar, bread, some form of milk and chicken these things you can find everywhere.  Flour and Rice are also readily available though I know from experience that in most countries outside Western Europe they come complete with their resident beasties and that’s just a fact of life you have to learn to deal with. You can sift them out or float them off in most cases, or just get used to a little extra protein in your diet.  I remember reading Annie Hill’s account of life aboard where they toasted their Ryvita’s to re-crisp them and then flicked off the weevils that came crawling out of the holes with the heat before they ate them.  I remember thinking right then that if anything on my boat ever got infested with beasties like that it would be straight over the side!  But having spent some time in the tropics where much of the food available for sale is contaminated you just have to learn to get on with it and add the extra rinse or sift into your cooking routine. 

Other things even things we consider staples like eggs are not so plentiful in some of the places we have been.  I’ve been experimenting with some recipes that use Aquafaba, usually a waste product on lots of boats to see what recipes are possible with it as a substitute for eggs.  If you don’t know what Aquafaba is, it’s the gloopy liquid that comes in cans of beans and peas such as chickpeas that most people throw away when they open a can of beans.  I have tried it as a binding agent in baking, for pancakes and to make mayonnaise so far and the recipes have come out perfect.  As fridges are generally small on boats, if they have them at all, and tins are a large part of any boats long term supplies  I’ll be planning my cooking to include the gloop from the tins as well as the normal contents. 

I’ll also be squeezing in some of the things that I know are expensive over-seas like good wine which is ubiquitous and cheap here in Portugal, good olive oil and  good honey a must have in my cupboard as I come from a beekeeping  family. Good honey is the cure for so many things I don’t know how to live without it.  (An in-depth topic for another blog maybe?)  Olive oil in Portugal and Spain is often eaten as a substitute for butter which is difficult to store on boats unless you can find it in tins as it takes up valuable fridge space.

The other thing going in our bilges are a few special ingredients that make the holidays without old friends and family feel festive.  For me Christmas is not quite Christmas without mince pies and for Steve its Christmas Cake and sausage rolls so to make the party happen I’ll be stashing some dark brown sugar, treacle, suet, dried fruit, mixed spice and some decent port and brandy.  I think it’s important to think ahead to things like festival times and bring the ingredients to make it a moment to remember. The devil is in the details. Without those small reminders of Christmases gone by, our next one could just be another bbq at the beach with a load of boat-bums. What will make that one any more festive than any other beach  bbq  we are likely to enjoy?   A few dodgy carols playing on a beat box in the background?  No way! Let’s feast and be merry!!