Collage of Caves, a Crator and Cacti taken on our Island tour of Lanzarote

Island tour – a Change is as good as a rest

How many times have I quoted the old saying, that the Cruising life = fixing your boat in Exotic places?  Well we finally got to see a little of this exotic place in which we now find ourselves fixing our boat and it was fab! Lanzarote  the most easterly of the Canary Islands is a bleak and barren place  peppered with  volcanoes  some of them active as recently as 1824 which has left  more than a quarter of the island  covered with lava and ash.  A lot of the island looks more like a moonscape than regular earth. This landscape combined with the fact that they only get on average 16 days of rain a year on this island, makes it a very dry and dusty place.  In no time at all, every inch of the boat, especially the forward facing surfaces that are blasted by the wind while at anchor were caked in ochre dust and after only one day we could write “also available in white” all over the boat. 

In spite of its dust and bleakness the island is incredibly beautiful and the people give it real character and charm.  Although the volcano ash makes for very fertile ground, very little grows there because of the lack of water.  A very few weeds manage to populate the landscape despite the harsh environment. In the north there are fields and fields of cacti formerly for the cochineal beetles surrounded by dry stone walls made of lava rock.  In the centre and south of the island grape vines have been planted, each surrounded by its own little wall on three sides to give it protection. As Lava rock is porous it soaks up what little moisture they do get and gives it up gradually but pretty much every speck of green on the island needs to be watered.

The islands beauty comes from the different shapes and colours of rock formed by exposure of different minerals or different rates of cooling when the volcanoes erupted thousands of years ago.  Most of the beaches on the island have black volcanic sand, though we did anchor off of Playa Blanca for a few days. This beach is rather obviously named because it is one of the few beaches on island with white sand that shows its original topography before all the volcanoes poured their mayhem over most of the island. 

We hired a car for a day and did the tourist thing. I have to warn you that Steve and I have both done a lot of travelling in our lives and seen some stunning places. Because of this we are very picky sort of tourists and have become rather hard to impress.  Tourist attractions have to be going some for us to give them the thumbs up for wow factor but on Lanzarote our thumbs are definitely up. 

We bought a ticket that allowed us to see three places on the Island for the handsome sum of €21 which seemed like a good chunk of cash but at the end of the day We feel we definitely got our money’s worth.

We visited the Cueva De Los Verdes, the green caves that were in fact ochre and red and yellow and white and every shade of brown and grey in-between.  Actually the caves were a huge array of colours due to the iron oxide, sulphur and mineral salts seeping out of the rock. The only colour they were not, was green. The name green comes from the family that made the caves their home many years ago. The caves have offered shelter to many of the Islanders who used the caves as a refuge from the marauding pirates in the 16th and 17th centuries. 

These caves formed by air pockets trapped between the lava were very different to the normal stalactite, stalagmite formations in all the other caves we have seen. These caves were by far the biggest and longest, we have ever had the pleasure to visit. The caves start at the centre cone of the volcano and run all the way for 6km down into and under the sea. We were able to visit about a kilometre of it and it was truly impressive.  In some of the caverns you could see three stories above and below you.  For the benefit of tourists like us, the Cabildo of Lanzarote, in collaboration with the artist Jesus Soto very sensitively installed lighting, sounds and footpaths to make it into a spectacular visitor attraction. The deepest part of the caverns where it seems you can look down deep into the bowels of the earth is a surprise all of its own.  Very impressive!

Our second destination was the cacti garden.  The garden is a gorgeous space which was created by the artist Cesar Manrique that beautifully blends art and nature. Hundreds of different species of cacti from all over the world are planted in a big tiered bowl, reminiscent of an old quarry.  You can look down from each level and admire shapes and colours below.  There was lots of inspiration here for my garden back in Portugal when we return.

Our final tourist trap was the national park of Timanfaya the site of the most recent active volcanic eruptions on the island between 1730 and 1736 and again in 1824.  The park covers a huge area and you are taken on a bus tour on a tiny windy road with spectacular views down steep ravines and into crators through the ash scattered land.

It was a bit of a surprise to be herded onto a bus, but in hind sight we were very glad not to have had to negotiate all those hairpin bends ourselves. The road seemed rather treacherous in places but fortunately the bus driver knew it well and was able negotiate the tight steep turns with seeming ease.  Being driven meant we were able to just take in the awe inspiring views all around us and the commentary in multiple languages was very informative.

  Back at the visitor centre a few bore holes have been drilled, into which they pour water; and after a few seconds, a huge boiling hot geyser spurts out of the hole into the air.  This shows how just under our feet, the volcano is still ruminating and could erupt at any time.

 Also at the visitor centre there is a restaurant which we didn’t eat at, but their menu offers a selection of barbequed meat and fish dishes cooked by the volcano. They have a huge hole in the ground with a wall around it that looks like a big water well with a grill over the top. The heat of the volcano cooks your dinner at a temperature of about 285 degrees.

We wound our way back through the moonscape land, past some of the islands larger vineyards to the marina after a busy day full of lasting impressions. We didn’t have time to visit any of the bodegas that day but we did sample some of their produce and I must say the local wine is very pleasant indeed! We can’t let you taste the wine but we can give you a flavour of our day out in our latest YouTube video  that accompanies this blog. 

Why not go there next and take a look? 

Cacti Caves & Craters       Click to view